Can a valid argument have true premises and a true conclusion?

Can a valid argument have true premises and a true conclusion?

Can a valid argument have true premises and a true conclusion?

A valid argument can have false premises; and it can have a false conclusion. But if a valid argument has all true premises, then it must have a true conclusion. ... Since a sound argument is valid, it is such that if all the premises are true then the conclusion must be true.

Can there be false premises and a true conclusion?

False premises can lead to either a true or a false conclusion even in a valid argument. In these examples, luck rather than logic led to the true conclusion.

Can an inductive argument have all true premises and a true conclusion?

This argument is inductively strong because if all its premises were true, then it would be highly likely or probable that its conclusion would also true. Inductively strong arguments may have: True premises, true conclusion.

Can a valid deductive argument have a true conclusion and false premises?

A valid deductive argument cannot have all false premises and a true conclusion. ... A valid deductive argument can have all false premises and a false conclusion. 9. Whether an argument is valid has nothing to do with whether any of it's premises are actually true.

Can a deductive argument have false premises and a true conclusion?

A valid deductive argument cannot have all false premises and a true conclusion. ... A valid deductive argument can have all false premises and a false conclusion. 9. Whether an argument is valid has nothing to do with whether any of it's premises are actually true.

How can a false premise result in a correct conclusion?

A false premise is an incorrect proposition that forms the basis of an argument or syllogism. Since the premise (proposition, or assumption) is not correct, the conclusion drawn may be in error. However, the logical validity of an argument is a function of its internal consistency, not the truth value of its premises.

What is an invalid argument?

  • An invalid argument, is simply an argument where the conclusions drawn do not necessarily follow from the premises used. In contrast, a valid argument is one in which the conclusions do necessarily follow from the premises.

What is an example of false premise?

  • What is an example of false premise? A false premise is an incorrect proposition that forms the basis of an argument or syllogism. For example, consider this syllogism, which involves a false premise: If the streets are wet, it has rained recently. (premise) Can a conclusion be true if the premises are false?

What is false premise fallacy?

  • A false premise is an incorrect proposition that forms the basis of an argument or syllogism. Since the premise (proposition, or assumption) is not correct, the conclusion drawn may be in error. However, the logical validity of an argument is a function of its internal consistency, not the truth value of its premises.

What is a premise argument?

  • A premise or premiss is a statement that an argument claims will induce or justify a conclusion. In other words, a premise is an assumption that something is true. In logic, an argument requires a set of (at least) two declarative sentences (or "propositions") known as the premises or premisses along with another...

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