Is depression found in all cultures?

Is depression found in all cultures?

Is depression found in all cultures?

Many of the risk factors for depression are similar across cultures. These include gender, unemployment, traumatic events. The themes of depression tend to revolve around loss. But what people make of their losses and how they interpret their distress differs tremendously across cultures.

Which culture has the most mental illness?

People who identify as being two or more races (24.9%) are most likely to report any mental illness within the past year than any other race/ethnic group, followed by American Indian/Alaska Natives (22.7%), white (19%), and black (16.8%).

Is depression more common in the Western world?

Yet research shows a rather interesting pattern: depression is far more prevalent in Western cultures, such as the US, Canada, France, Germany and New Zealand, than in Eastern cultures, such as Taiwan, Korea, Japan and China. This shows that depression is a modern health epidemic that is also culture-specific.

Is depression a universal disorder?

Prevalence of depression worldwide According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 350 million people worldwide suffer from depression. Depression thus is a universal disorder. It is found all over the world, disregarding the culture or societal vision.

Are disorders the same across cultures?

The prevalence of some of the most common specific disorders and syndromes as well as its risk and protective factors vary across cultures, yet comorbid patterns and response to treatments vary little across cultures. Cross-cultural longitudinal data on outcomes is equivocal.

How do cultures differ in terms of depression?

One of the main differences seen across cultures is the way anxiety and depression is expressed. Someone from a culture where it is common to know psychological terms, could easily describe anxiety and depression using those specific words. In other cultures, other words might be more common.

Which countries have the most mental health issues?

According to WHO estimates, the ten countries with the highest prevalence of depression are:

  • Ukraine (6.3%)
  • United States (5.9%)
  • Estonia (5.9%)
  • Australia (5.9%)
  • Brazil (5.8%)
  • Greece (5.7%)
  • Portugal (5.7%)
  • Belarus (5.6%)

Is depression more common in developed countries?

People who live in wealthy countries are slightly more likely to be depressed than those in low- to middle-income countries, a new study of global depression rates suggests. In the study, close to 15 percent of people in high-income countries said they experienced depression at some point in their lives.

Which countries have the highest depression rates?

According to WHO estimates, the ten countries with the highest prevalence of depression are:

  • Ukraine (6.3%)
  • United States (5.9%)
  • Estonia (5.9%)
  • Australia (5.9%)
  • Brazil (5.8%)
  • Greece (5.7%)
  • Portugal (5.7%)
  • Belarus (5.6%)

How does culture influence the way people experience depression?

  • Culture also appears to influence the way people experience depression. Research shows that individual's experience with depression can vary from country to country. For example, a qualitative study revealed that some countries did not recognize post-natal depression as an illness; rather,...

Is it more socially acceptable to have depression in Western societies?

  • It is more socially acceptable to have a depressive disorder in Western societies, and more people from these cultures are willing to seek help. In contrast, mental illness is often more stigmatized in other cultures.

How does depression vary from country to country?

  • An individual's experience with depression can vary from country to country. For example, a qualitative study revealed that some countries did not recognize post-natal depression as an illness; rather, it was viewed as a state of unhappiness that did not require any health interventions.

Are there any cultural beliefs about mental illness?

  • A review of ethnocultural beliefs and mental illness stigma by Abdullah et al. (2011) highlights the wide range of cultural beliefs surrounding mental health. For instance, while some American Indian tribes do not stigmatize mental illness, others stigmatize only some mental illnesses, and other tribes stigmatize all mental illnesses.

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