How do I verify a Purple Heart recipient?

How do I verify a Purple Heart recipient?

How do I verify a Purple Heart recipient?

You must be active duty or have an honorable/general discharge. Your DD-214, DD-215 or equivalent documentation (orders, command letters, etc.) must be submitted to validate the award along with a signed application or online application Lifetime membership application fee is $50.00.

What does a Purple Heart certificate look like?

The Purple Heart award is a heart-shaped medal within a gold border, 13⁄8 inches (35 mm) wide, containing a profile of General George Washington. Above the heart appears a shield of the coat of arms of George Washington (a white shield with two red bars and three red stars in chief) between sprays of green leaves.

Are Purple Heart recipients public record?

The awarding of Purple Hearts was a decentralized process and there is no single collection of records for purple heart award files. General orders awarding Purple Hearts are typically found in individual unit records or the records of the military hospital where the soldier was treated.

What are Purple Hearts worth?

In today's military collectibles market, Purple Hearts doled out during World War II tend to be worth $300 to $400, Kraska said.

Where can I find a list of Purple Heart recipients?

The Roll of Honor also contains the names of recipients who have served from the Civil War to today. For more information or to enroll a Purple Heart recipient, please call 845-561-17-284-6667, or by visiting the website: www.thepurpleheart.com.

Who received Purple Hearts?

The Purple Heart medal is presented to service members who have been wounded or killed as a result of enemy action while serving in the U.S. military. A Purple Heart is a solemn distinction and means a service member has greatly sacrificed themselves, or paid the ultimate price, while in the line of duty.

Do Purple Heart medals have serial numbers?

medals struck in 1942—with a six-digit serial number—appeared as late as the Vietnam War. Using general specifications provided to her, Will created the design sketch for the present medal of the Purple Heart.

Can a Purple Heart medal be sold?

Pending before Congress is the Private Corrado A. G. Piccolo Purple Heart Preservation Act. If passed, the Act will make it illegal for anyone other than the recipient to sell a Purple Heart Medal that has been awarded.

Are Purple Hearts real gold?

While gold in color, it's important to note that the Purple Heart does not actually contain real gold. Instead, it's made of gilding-metal. The copper alloy is composed of copper and zinc, technically making it a form of brass, not gold.

Who is a recipient of the Purple Heart?

  • The Purple Heart Medal is Awarded to any member of the Armed Forces of the United States or any civilian national of the United States who, while serving under competent authority in any capacity with one of the U.S. Armed Forces, after Ap, has been wounded, killed, or who has died or may hereafter die of wounds received under any...

Can a person get the Purple Heart posthumously?

  • The PH cannot be awarded posthumously or after discharge from military service. Not true. The majority of (but not necessarily all) combat deaths are automatically awarded the PH.

When did the Purple Heart Medal become available?

  • A few years later in 1942, President Roosevelt and the War Department further defined the qualifications for receiving a Purple Heart, designating it for those who were wounded or killed in action. They also expanded the eligibility of the award to all military branches of service and gave authorization to present posthumous Purple Heart medals.

How many Purple Hearts were awarded in Iraq?

  • In 2000, there remained 120,000 Purple Heart medals in stock. The existing surplus allowed combat units in Iraq and Afghanistan to keep Purple Hearts on-hand for immediate award to soldiers wounded in the field. The "History" section of the November 2009 edition of National Geographic estimated the number of Purple Hearts given.

Related Posts: