How many hours do air traffic controllers work?

How many hours do air traffic controllers work?

How many hours do air traffic controllers work?

Air traffic controllers usually work between 37 and 40 hours a week, but this is spread out over days, nights, weekends and public holidays. Air traffic control has to be manned 24 hours a day, so shift work is used to ensure there is always cover.

Do air traffic controllers have flexible hours?

The FAA regulates the hours that an air traffic controller may work. Controllers may not work more than 10 straight hours during a shift and must have 9 hours' rest before their next shift. Controllers may rotate shifts among day, evening, and night, because major control facilities operate continuously.

Why air traffic controllers take breaks?

It is important to try to take periodic breaks from your main task as this will help you to stay alert and manage fatigue. Air traffic controllers can use breaks to do other non-operational tasks (such as training reports, logging information) and some of these may actually add to your fatigue.

Do air traffic controllers get days off?

Depending on length of service, Air Traffic Controllers receive 13 to 26 days of vacation and 13 days of sick leave each year, in addition to life insurance and health benefits. Controllers can also retire at an earlier age and with fewer years of service than other Federal employees.

Is air traffic controller a stressful job?

Air traffic controllers, who maintain the flow of aircraft in and out of airports and in flight, are key to aviation safety. This is well recognized as one of the most stressful jobs, requiring total concentration.

Can air traffic controllers work overtime?

Air Traffic Controllers usually work a standard 40-hour week, but may work some overtime. Since most control towers and centers operate around the clock, Air Traffic Controllers work rotating night and weekend shifts.

Why air traffic controllers take breaks every 2 hours?

The night shift is followed by two rest days, to minimise sleep deficit and fatigue and allow an immediate recovery of lost sleep. ... During the night shift, the controllers are entitled to a rest break of 2-3 hours during which they can sleep in rest rooms next to the control room.

Why do air traffic controllers have to be under 31?

Why do air traffic controllers have to be under 31? The FAA has an age limit of 31 for new air traffic controllers because they've found (through actual research) that the older someone is, the less likely they are to complete the required extensive training program.

Is ATC a stressful job?

Air traffic controllers, who maintain the flow of aircraft in and out of airports and in flight, are key to aviation safety. This is well recognized as one of the most stressful jobs, requiring total concentration.

How long is a break in air traffic control?

  • Breaks are always at least 30 minutes, and usually 45–60 minutes. Every facility is equipped with nap rooms specifically to combat fatigue. A controller is not expected to be available for immediate recall while on break. They are expected to rest and be 100% ready to work when they return to work.

How often does an air traffic controller work?

  • Regular scheduled shifts cycles ensure a controller works 17 days out of every 28. Typically, that will involve a work 'week' involving 6 days on, with 4 days off (or 5 on and 3 off). Overtime is common, but no controller is permitted to work more than 9 days in a row.

How many days can a controller work in a week?

  • Typically, that will involve a work 'week' involving 6 days on, with 4 days off (or 5 on and 3 off). Overtime is common, but no controller is permitted to work more than 9 days in a row. A shift is usually 8.5 hours (longer shifts exist, but they include some form of overtime).

Why do air traffic controllers have so much stress?

  • They alternate between stress and boredom. Because they’re responsible for thousands of lives 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, most air traffic controllers experience a high level of job-related stress. “We often miss birthdays, we work on holidays and weekends, and often operate on alternative sleep cycles,” Miller explains.

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